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Tampa Assault & Battery Attorney

Causing intentional physical harm to another or even the threat of harm is a very serious crime in Florida and the penalties for being convicted of assault and battery can haunt a person for the rest of their lives. Future employers may see a felony checked by your name and not even glance at the rest of your resume, no matter how qualified you are. However, there is a big difference between a misdemeanor and a felony, and an experienced attorney with the ability to employ negotiating skills in a plea bargain can make all the difference during sentencing. We are also more than willing to take your case all the way to a jury trial if need be to clear your name of all allegations. Whether you were acting in self defense, the false charges are entirely baseless, or you were simply caught in a bad moment and were not able to contain your anger, the charges brought against you may very well stick without legal guidance. A misdemeanor or felony are likely outcomes of assault and battery charges for those without the most qualified attorneys. And, depending on the specific circumstances of the situation, you may end up spending a serious amount of time behind bars as a consequence. The sooner we act, the better your chances are of beating allegations of assault and battery. Call Roman & Roman in Tampa today at 877-767-1032 to speak with one of our Tampa assault & battery attorneys.

What is the Difference Between Assault and Battery?

Assault and battery are often thought of as the same offense. It would appear so based solely on the fact that they are often always put together in writing. However, there is a difference, technically speaking. Assault, according to statute 784.011, is an intentional threat of physical harm imposed by one person on another. Specifically:

“An assault is an intentional, unlawful threat by word or act to do violence to the person of another, coupled with an apparent ability to do so, and doing some act which creates a well-founded fear in such other person that such violence is imminent.”

No physical contact or injury has to occur for assault to have taken place. For example, one person could swing a pool cue at another in a bar, not make contact, and still be charged and convicted of assault, which is a class two misdemeanor in Florida. A class two misdemeanor is punishable with a fine of up to $500 and a stint in jail for up to 60 days, and the charge will always show up on the convicted person’s criminal record. Battery is a more serious offense. Assault and battery, also termed just battery, is essentially following through on the assault and making unwanted physical contact or harm. A person commits battery, according to statute 784.03, when that person:

“Actually and intentionally touches or strikes another person against the will of the other; or Intentionally causes bodily harm to another person.”

Assault and battery can be charged as a first degree misdemeanor, third degree felony, or second degree felony, the last of which is punishable by a prison sentence of up to 15 years. Contact our experienced Tampa assault and battery defense attorneys today at 877-767-1032 to begin the process of putting this troubling incident behind you as quickly as possible. Our Tampa Assault and Battery Defense Attorneys Professionals at the offices of Roman & Roman are eager to help you today.

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